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Small Business, Big Bucks
The Kelsey Group reports that small businesses in the US will spend more than $2.2 billion by 2005 on localized e-mail marketing. Kelsey surveyed 600 small businesses and found that 42% will use e-mail for some form of marketing by 2005.

Nielsen//NetRatings, and Harris Interactive (Nasdaq: HPOL), reported that nearly half, or 100.2 million people, of the U.S. adult population have made a purchase online. Furthermore, more than 81.2 percent of all adults with Web access have made a purchase online since they started using the Internet

Nielsen//NetRatings estimates that nine out of the top ten US rich media advertisers in Q1 2002 were traditional firms. According to the IAB and PwC, just 2% of e-ad revenue in the first three quarters of 2001 came from rich media.

Pew reports that 68 million US adults have used government agency websites -- 77% have gone to government websites for tourism or recreational information and 15% have addressed environmental issues.

A Quris survey determined that 52% of consumers will delete an e-mail from an unrecognized name without even opening it, whereas 3% will do the same from a permission e-mail marketing (PEM) company.

Progress & Freedom reports that 90% of US websites collect personal identifying information, 87% of which post at least one privacy disclosure.

Text, HTML and Rich Media: Which Format Works for E-Mail Marketing?

According to the Opt-in news 2002 Email Marketing Factbook, 62% of global consumers say they prefer text-based e-mail advertisments whereas just 35% say the same about HTML and 3% say they prefer rich media e-mail ads.

A recent BizRate survey determined that 43% of US online shoppers say that they sometimes use comparison shopping bots when shopping online and 34% say they use the bots most of the time.

The Digital State 2001 report from The Progress & Freedom Foundation announces that in terms of digital applications (e-commerce, law, management, education, etc.) the top two US states are Illinois and Kansas, each gaining a score of 91.8 out of 100 in 2001.

Traditional Firms Choose Unconventional E-Ad Format

Nielsen//NetRatings estimates that nine out of the top ten US rich media advertisers in Q1 2002 were traditional firms. According to the IAB and PwC, just 2% of e-ad revenue in the first three quarters of 2001 came from rich media.

Scarborough finds that 69% of households with income of $75,000 or more accessed the internet at home, compared to 27% of those households with annual income of $25,000 or less.

Progress & Freedom reports that 90% of US websites collect personal identifying information, 87% of which post at least one privacy disclosure.

Yesawich, Pepperdine & Brown and Yankelovich Partners find that 32% of travelers went online to book travel arrangements and 53% used the net to get travel information in 2002

Country Percentage of Online Shoppers

Sweden - 27% Norway - 26% UK - 22% Germany - 21% Netherlands - 18% Finland - 16% France - 8% Spain - 8% Italy - 7%

Source: eMarketers' eStats for 25 April 2002.

The Media Audit reports that 74.5 million US adults in 85 designated market areas (DMAs) said they had logged onto the internet "in the past month" in 2002 -- up from 68.7 million who said the same in 2000.

Worldwide revenues in the corporate e-learning market will surpass $23 billion by 2004, according to IDC. Not too bad when you consider the market was less than $2 billion at the end of 1999. April 9, 2001

Scarborough reports that 62% of US adults own a cellphone, 72% of whom access the internet and 66% of whom use e-mail.

Despite growing evidence of an economic turnaround, woes continue to plague the Internet-related trade publishing industry, as the owner of longtime direct marketing trade DM News looks to fold the publication's Internet-focused sibling, iMarketing News and to shift coverage of the online sector back to its flagship weekly paper. The merge will take place on May 6, when the three year old iMarketing News will move to the DM web marketing news section.

SOURCE: Internet.com

A National Federation of Independent Business report found that 18 percent of the members reported finding qualified labor is the most important problem facing their business.

It is estimated that every 3 out of 5 jobs created during the next 5 years will have relatively high skills requirements.

Over 90 percent of United States companies engaged in manufacturing are small and medium-sized businesses. Small business is the driving force behind our Nation's economy and such businesses play a critical role in the United States economy.

In the United States, business-to-business transactions between small and medium-sized manufacturers and other such businesses and their suppliers is rapidly growing, as many of these businesses begin to use Internet connections for supply-chain management, after-sales support, and payments. In 2000, business-to-business electronic transactions were estimated at nearly $200,000,000,000, and business-to-consumer electronic transactions at $61,000,000,000.

The rise of the Internet has provided more than 300 million people around the world with access to knowledge and information, fueling innovation and facilitating communication on an unprecedented scale.

The rise of the Internet has fueled the economy of the United States by expanding job growth, increasing productivity, and contributing to the growth of information technology, which has accounted for nearly one-third of the growth in the gross domestic product since 1995.

The statements above are excerpts from congressional bills, resolutions, and other pending legislature in the 107th Congress

Only one-quarter of the global Internet population will reside in the US by 2005, but only one-third of American online businesses are targeting global markets, according to Jupiter Research.

The number of individuals with Internet access from their home grew by nearly 7 million people in March 2001 to 379 million people, according to Nielsen//NetRatings Global Internet Index. Active Internet usage grew nearly 4 percent to 211 million people.

Nielsen//NetRatings, and Harris Interactive (Nasdaq: HPOL), reported that nearly half, or 100.2 million people, of the U.S. adult population have made a purchase online. Furthermore, more than 81.2 percent of all adults with Web access have made a purchase online since they started using the Internet.

There will be 8,034 billion webpages by 2002, according to IDC.



Corporate Websites Lack Information
Just one-third of corporate websites provide the information that journalists want for their stories, according to a 2001 Vocus study. The top three site features that journalists seek are press releases, 24-hour contact information and basic information on the company. Three out of five journalists surveyed said the information they find on a company's site affects whether they include the company in a story. More than 90% said they waste a great deal of time looking through corporate sites for what they need.

Dot-Com Layoffs Finally Decline
Layoffs in the Internet industry declined by 24% in May 2001, finds a Challenger, Gray & Christmas report. The number of dot-com pink slips dropped to 13,419 worldwide, a month after April's record-setting 17,554. With 5,860 job cuts in May, companies that provide infrastructure support to other dot-coms led all sectors for the third consecutive month. Close behind were customer service firms (3,462 cuts), professional services firms (2,265) and Internet portals (955). CGC found that layoffs in the e-tail sector dipped considerably, from 2,284 in April to just 310 in May.

US Homes with High-Speed Connections on the Rise
According to Statistical Research Inc. (SRI), the number of households with high-speed connections in the US grew from 5.2 million in November 2000 to 9.4 million in May 2001. SRI says that in May, 6.5 million connections were via cable modem and 2.8 million were digital subscriber line (DSL). In November, cable modems represented only two-thirds of the broadband connections. SRI also mentions that the percentage of households with telephone lines dropped over the time frame: from 89% to 83%.

Small Business, Big Bucks
The Kelsey Group reports that small businesses in the US will spend more than $2.2 billion by 2005 on localized e-mail marketing. Kelsey surveyed 600 small businesses and found that 42% will use e-mail for some form of marketing by 2005.

Internet Presence Pays Off
Companies expect the percentage of revenue they generate as a result of their Internet presence to grow considerably in 2001, according to IDC. Worldwide, internet-influenced sales (among companies with established websites) are projected to increase from a 2000 average of 4.7% of total sales to a 2001 average of 9.5%. Led by the US, four countries had a mean percentage of internet-influenced sales exceeding 8%; in 2001, nine countries are expected to hit that mark.

Uncle Sam to Increase eShopping Habit
Jupiter Media Metrix predicts that local, state and federal government agencies in the US will spend nearly $300 billion over the internet by 2005. The total is a sharp increase from the $5 billion in online spending forecast for 2001. Much of the growth is expected to come at the federal level, where just 0.2% of current spending is done online.

US Wireless Market Swells
Spending on wireless services in the US totaled $57.6 billion in 2000, an increase of 23.1% over the previous year. The Telecommunications Industry Association forecasts that spending will grow at a 17% compound annual rate through 2004. After a 2000 total of $77.5 billion, the overall wireless market (including equipment) is expected to reach $134.1 billion in 2004.

Total domains registered worldwide: 15,179,462 and growing every second

Total number of .com domains: 9,482,427 and growing every second

According to a recent Employment Policy Foundation (EPF) report, 51% (54.5 million) of US households have at least one computer. In addition, 43.5 million also have internet access. The EPF predicts that by November 2002, 68.2% of US households will have computers and 66.9% will have a computer and internet access.

According to WindWire's First-to-Wireless 2000 report, 76% of wireless internet users in the US plan to increase their usage between Q1 and Q2 2001.
US consumer e-commerce sales will reach $37 billion by year-end 2000, double from the previous year and will grow by a factor of 13 overall from 1998 to 2003, according to a report by e marketer.

The percentage of small businesses accessing the Internet surpassed 52 percent in 1999, and that number will climb to more than 70 percent by 2003, according to research by IDC.

Almost 13 percent of US small businesses have yet to invest in a PC, never mind add Internet capability.

e-commerce presents the most significant growth opportunity for a wide range of US small businesses. The number of these companies selling goods and services online will grow from 850,000 at the end of 1999 to 2.9 million in 2003.

Men are not as motivated to click on an Internet banner ad as women, according to a survey of 2,812 Internet users conducted by pc data.

As far as competing with traditional forms of advertising, 66 percent of the respondents to a Quicken study spend more on traditional media than online media. Nineteen percent of companies have an even mix of traditional and online marketing, and only 6 percent spend more online than on traditional media.

The costs of existing procurement processes can average a hefty $50 to $250 per transaction, but these costs can be reduced to the $5 to $20 range per transaction using Web-based procurement processes, according to a study by Zona research.

US business-to-business (B2B) e-commerce will hit $2.7 trillion in 2004, as more than 90 percent of firms interviewed described plans to buy and sell on the Internet, according to a report by Forrester research.

According to research by Gartner, the worldwide B2B market will grow from $145 billion in 1999 to $403 billion in 2000, and $953 billion in 2001. In 2002, the market will increase to $2.18 trillion, and at the end of 2003 worldwide B2B revenue is forecast to reach $3.95 trillion. By 2004, B2B e-commerce will represent 7 percent of the forecasted $105 trillion total global sales transactions.

The number of small businesses with a Web presence has nearly doubled since 1998, and the coming years will see an even more dramatic increase, according to a nationwide survey of companies with fewer than 100 employees by International Communications Research.

The Internet economy in the US grew 68 percent from the first quarter of 1998 to the first quarter of 1999, pumping an estimated $507 billion into the US economy and employing 2.3 million Americans, according to a study by the University of Texas.

ActivMedia's report "Real Numbers Behind the Online B-to-B Industry" found that 42 percent of business-to-business e-commerce sites that have been online for three years and 27 percent of the sites that have been online for less than one year are realizing profits.

In perhaps its first year as a true medium of the masses, Internet
advertising expenditures climbed to $4.62 billion, growing 141 percent over the $1.92 billion reported for 1998, according to the Internet Advertising Bureau's (IAB) Internet Ad Revenue Report.

According to a study by Shop.org and The Boston Consulting Group, business-to-consumer e-commerce reached $33.1 billion in 1999.

According to a report by Forrester Research, the driver of US online
business travel will be corporate policy, versus individual travel. The
report found that companies are eager to save travel and processing costs will mandate the use of Web-based corporate booking engines. The few remaining unmanaged business travelers will buy online just like leisure travelers.

"In 2000, managed travel will already account for 57 percent of the $4.9 billion businesses spend on travel online," said Henry Harteveldt, senior analyst at Forrester. "By 2004, however, corporate policy will dictate the spending of 77 percent of the $20.3 billion of business travel booked online."

The number of people who filed their taxes electronically has increased dramatically, almost 30 percent in the past year, according to International Data Corp. (IDC). One-third of these filers are first-time electronic filing users.

B2B eCommerce will hit $2.7 trillion in 2004. While Internet trade between individual partners will continue to flourish, eMarket places will fuel most of the growth -- reaching 53% of all online business trade in five years.

Gartner Group had surveyed 13,000 email users and asked them what other forms of spam they experienced; 34 percent answered, "pop-up ads." For advertisers, it's hard enough not having ads noticed or interacted with in the way they would like. And to many users, pop-ups are just annoying, no matter how large or enhanced they may be.

The entire market for xDSL products and services will be worth approximately $10.4 billion by 2003, compared with $252 million in 1999.

The market for cable modem products and services will be worth approximately $8.6 billion by 2003, as compared with $860 million in 1999; most of the cable modems will offer two-way service.

31 million Americans have listened to Web radio over the past year.

Video hasn¹t fared as well. Only about 16 million have watched a streamed video clip on the Internet.

The number of Internet users around the world is constantly growing. The Computer Industry Almanac has reported that by the year 2002, 490 million people around the world will have Internet access, that is 79.4 per 1,000 people worldwide, and 118 people per 1,000 by year-end 2005. The top 15 countries will account for nearly 82 percent of the these worldwide Internet users (including business, educational, and home Internet users). By the year 2000 there will be 25 countries where over 10 percent of the population will be Internet users.

The US has an overwhelming lead in Internet users with more than 110 million projected for year-end 1999, which is nearly 43 percent of the total 259 million worldwide Internet users. The US will have one-third of the total Internet users in 2002, and that number will decline to 27 percent by the end of 2005.

With more than 1 million unique buyers and a 28 percent jump in traffic, CDNow.com claimed the No. 1 position on February's Top 20 Retailers list, according to PC Data Online.

CDNow unseated Amazon.com, which has reigned in the top spot since June 1999, when PC Data Online first began tracking Web buying patterns. Amazon.com logged 984,000 unique buyers in February, falling below the 1 million unique buyers' mark for the first time since August 1999. At the same time, Amazon.com had considerably larger traffic numbers than CDNow.com's 8.2 million.

At-work users typically have faster Internet connections than home users who still rely mainly on dial-up access. According to Nielsen//NetRatings, the gender composition for Web usage at work mirrors the make-up of the male dominated US workforce. In the month of February, the gender breakdown for at-work Internet users was 54 percent men and 46 percent women, as compared to the 50-50 proportion of men to women surfers at home. Women, however, still spend less time online than men, both at-home and at-work where females surfed an average of 18 hours as compared to the 22 hours spent by males, and at-home where females logged 8 hours compared to the 10 hours surfed by men.

As business-to-business transactions continue to outpace business-to-consumer transactions in e-commerce, it should come as no surprise that online advertising is now beginning to show a decidedly B2B bias. According to data collected by AdRelevance, growth in online advertising by B2B companies has outstripped all other industries for the last four months.

E-Mail Continues to Take Over the World The number of worldwide electronic mailboxes soared an amazing 83 percent in 1999, topping 569 million by year's end, according to a study by Messaging Online.

A common banner ad package consists of 100,000 impressions costing anywhere from $20 to $100 per thousand ($25-$70 CPM is average for popular sites). Keep in mind that most sites have repeat visitors, and most visitors view more than a single page of information, so your 100,000 impressions could actually represent 10,000 to 40,000 unique visitors. In some cases, impressions are guaranteed, in others, estimated. Some sites will charge a flat rate for estimated impressions.

Think there's no way you could sell hamburgers on the Web? Why not use your site to sell visitors on registering for "digital discount coupons" for your "special of the month"?! Just print and present one to the restaurant "nearest you!"